AREA E

One important focus of our work was near the western end of the dromos of Tholos IV. In 2013 Katerina Skiada, representing the Kalamata Ephoreia, excavated in this area in conjunction with the construction of a concrete path from the parking lot to the tholos. After finding the top of a wall, she stopped digging just beneath the surface. In 2015 excavation resumed under the supervision of Evangelia Malapani, uncovering parts of three walls; excavation continued in early autumn 2015, then stopped at the bottom of these walls.

 

We were invited to continue excavation in this area, our Area E, where we opened seven trenches (E01, -02, -03, -04, -05, -06, and -07). In these, we uncovered parts of additional walls. All of the walls in this area seem to be of LH IIIA:2 early date. In all trenches, beneath the walls and extending to bedrock, was a substantial deposit of pottery and bone that sloped from north to south. The character of finds from the deposit suggest that it represents the remains of a ritual feast of LH IIIA:2 early that was used to level the ground prior to buildings subsequently being constructed here in the same period.

 

Complex in front of the dromos to Tholos IV. Denitsa Nenova

 

AREA D

In Area D we resumed excavations near the edge of the Dimopoulos plot, where several walls of the final phase of the palace were located, but no entire rooms. Several nearly complete vases were recovered, including a highly decorated rhyton.

 

Mycenaean rhyton with palm and whorlshell.

Architecture in trench N-D04.

 

AREA B

In 2015 in our Area B we had uncovered Early Mycenaean and Middle Helladic remains. This summer we opened two additional trenches near the Petropoulos plot where Marion Rawson had investigated Middle Helladic deposits in the 1950s, hoping to find substantial and well-preserved architectural remains. Instead we found well-preserved early Middle Helladic pottery lying near bedrock, beneath ca. 2.50 m. of re-deposited, largely sterile marl. Beneath the Middle Helladic pottery was a thin Pleistocene A-horizon, capping a B-horizon ca. 1 m. deep. In the A-horizon were two microliths, one perhaps of obsidian, the other chert.

Excavations in area B.

 

AREA C.

In trench C02 we resumed work in the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior itself, our objective this year being to examine the construction of the tomb and, we hoped, to gather additional information relevant to its chronology. With this in mind we opened three trenches adjacent to the grave, two of which were excavated down to the bottom of the exterior faces of the walls of the grave and were successful in detecting foundation trenches. Further cleaning inside the grave clarified the sequence of earth fills that had been deposited before the burial or had accumulated afterwards. Of the ca. 150 sherds of pottery from the various fills, none needs to be dated later than LH IIA. It now seems likely that the large stone in the eastern corner of the grave fell not long after the initial burial.

 

Further removal of fills along the walls of the grave inside revealed more cut, ashlar stones in their foundations; some at least appear to be reused paving slabs or drain covers, presumably scavenged from structures on the acropolis.

 

 

Exctract of 3D photogrammetry model

(Credit: Denitsa Nenova)

 

SUBSIDIARY ACTIVITIES

Other activities this summer included cleaning the storeroom in which PRAP and MARWP finds had been stored since the 1990s. The integrity of storage containers was checked and improvements made to the storeroom.This project was carried out by Efi Tsolaki in conjunction with restudy of finds from PRAP for her Ph.D. thesis.

 

Emily Egan studied fragments of painted plaster from excavations in preparation for the new roof over the Palace of Nestor. She will report on those that are of LH I-IIIA date at the conference: “(SOCIAL) PLACE AND SPACE IN EARLY MYCENAEAN GREECE,” October 5th to October 8th in Athens. Hariclia Brecoulaki also briefly studied fragments from Blegen’s excavations of Hall 64 in preparation for a monograph that she is completing.

 

 

Conservation, photography, and drawing of finds from the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior continued. We are grateful to Chronis Papanikolopoulos for photography, and to Nefeli Theocharous, Wendy Reade, and Kathy Hall for conservation.  We further thank Tom Brogan, director of the INSTAP Center in East Crete for his constant support and advice.

One bronze object that we had imagined to be a meathook (κρεάγρα) is instead an animal-headed grip for a staff or scepter. Conservation of the ivory handle of the bronze mirror found with the burial revealed a decorative pattern of delicately carved rosettes. Our first public lecture about the tomb will be hosted by the ASCSA in Cotsen Auditorium on October 6.

 

Paleobotanists from the University of Thessaloniki returned to pursue their study of remains from the Palace of Nestor and the Early Helladic II settlement at Romanou under the direction of Tania Valamoti.

 

 

 

Mirror handle with rosettes, after conservation

 

Bronze horned animal from staff or scepter, after conservation.

 

 

Finally, the Palace of Nestor reopened on June 12. We have been pleased to support the Ministry of Culture in its efforts to improve facilities at the site since 2011.

Carol Hershenson has contributed greatly to this enterprise by supplying numerous images from the Department of Classics’s archives.

 

                              2016

 

Excavations at the Palace of Nestor continued for a second season under the sponsorship of the University of Cincinnati and under the aegis of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens from May 15 until June 25, co-directed by Sharon R. Stocker and Jack L. Davis, representing the University of Cincinnati. The extent of excavation was reduced in scale this year, in part owing to the need to divert resources toward the conservation of the spectacular finds from the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior, and in part because of the Greek lawyers’ strike, which made it once again impossible for us to acquire the Dimopoulos plot, adjacent to Tholos IV, in time to excavate there this summer. In respect to the latter, a positive decision to expropriate the plot for the Greek state was made by the Greek court in the autumn of 2016.

 

In addition to work carried out in May and June 2016, various other studies were initiated in autumn 2015 and earlier in 2016: cloth fibers have been studied by Christina Margariti, carbonized plant matter by Maria Dinou, and metals composition by Andreas Karydas and Vicky Kontarelou. Georgia Tsartsidou began to look for phytoliths in soil samples. In addition, micromorphological samples have been prepared by Takis Karkanas.

 

 

NEW TRENCHES

All excavation in 2016 took place in the field that lies north of the parking lot, between the Northeast Gateway of the acropolis and Tholos IV. This is the field where we found the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior in 2015.

Contact

 

Project Directors:

Sharon Stocker: sharon.stocker@uc.edu

Jack Davis: jack.davis@uc.edu

The Griffin Warrior needs your help!

Webdesign: Takin.solutions Ltd. 2016-2018 | All Rights Reserved |  Web content: Palace of Nestor Excavations (PONEX)

 

AREA E

One important focus of our work was near the western end of the dromos of Tholos IV. In 2013 Katerina Skiada, representing the Kalamata Ephoreia, excavated in this area in conjunction with the construction of a concrete path from the parking lot to the tholos. After finding the top of a wall, she stopped digging just beneath the surface. In 2015 excavation resumed under the supervision of Evangelia Malapani, uncovering parts of three walls; excavation continued in early autumn 2015, then stopped at the bottom of these walls.

 

We were invited to continue excavation in this area, our Area E, where we opened seven trenches (E01, -02, -03, -04, -05, -06, and -07). In these, we uncovered parts of additional walls. All of the walls in this area seem to be of LH IIIA:2 early date. In all trenches, beneath the walls and extending to bedrock, was a substantial deposit of pottery and bone that sloped from north to south. The character of finds from the deposit suggest that it represents the remains of a ritual feast of LH IIIA:2 early that was used to level the ground prior to buildings subsequently being constructed here in the same period.

 

 

Complex in front of the dromos to Tholos IV. Denitsa Nenova

 

AREA D

In Area D we resumed excavations near the edge of the Dimopoulos plot, where several walls of the final phase of the palace were located, but no entire rooms. Several nearly complete vases were recovered, including a highly decorated rhyton.

 

Architecture in trench N-D04.

Mycenaean rhyton with palm and whorlshell.

 

AREA B

In 2015 in our Area B we had uncovered Early Mycenaean and Middle Helladic remains. This summer we opened two additional trenches near the Petropoulos plot where Marion Rawson had investigated Middle Helladic deposits in the 1950s, hoping to find substantial and well-preserved architectural remains. Instead we found well-preserved early Middle Helladic pottery lying near bedrock, beneath ca. 2.50 m. of re-deposited, largely sterile marl. Beneath the Middle Helladic pottery was a thin Pleistocene A-horizon, capping a B-horizon ca. 1 m. deep. In the A-horizon were two microliths, one perhaps of obsidian, the other chert.

 

Excavations in area B.

AREA C.

In trench C02 we resumed work in the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior itself, our objective this year being to examine the construction of the tomb and, we hoped, to gather additional information relevant to its chronology. With this in mind we opened three trenches adjacent to the grave, two of which were excavated down to the bottom of the exterior faces of the walls of the grave and were successful in detecting foundation trenches. Further cleaning inside the grave clarified the sequence of earth fills that had been deposited before the burial or had accumulated afterwards. Of the ca. 150 sherds of pottery from the various fills, none needs to be dated later than LH IIA. It now seems likely that the large stone in the eastern corner of the grave fell not long after the initial burial.

 

Further removal of fills along the walls of the grave inside revealed more cut, ashlar stones in their foundations; some at least appear to be reused paving slabs or drain covers, presumably scavenged from structures on the acropolis.

 

 

Exctract of 3D photogrammetry model

(Credit: Denitsa Nenova, Excavations at the Palace of Nestor).

 

SUBSIDIARY ACTIVITIES

Other activities this summer included cleaning the storeroom in which PRAP and MARWP finds had been stored since the 1990s. The integrity of storage containers was checked and improvements made to the storeroom.This project was carried out by Efi Tsolaki in conjunction with restudy of finds from PRAP for her Ph.D. thesis.

 

Emily Egan studied fragments of painted plaster from excavations in preparation for the new roof over the Palace of Nestor. She will report on those that are of LH I-IIIA date at the conference: “(SOCIAL) PLACE AND SPACE IN EARLY MYCENAEAN GREECE,” October 5th to October 8th in Athens. Hariclia Brecoulaki also briefly studied fragments from Blegen’s excavations of Hall 64 in preparation for a monograph that she is completing.

 

 

Conservation, photography, and drawing of finds from the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior continued. We are grateful to Chronis Papanikolopoulos for photography, and to Nefeli Theocharous, Wendy Reade, and Kathy Hall for conservation.  We further thank Tom Brogan, director of the INSTAP Center in East Crete for his constant support and advice.

One bronze object that we had imagined to be a meathook (κρεάγρα) is instead an animal-headed grip for a staff or scepter. Conservation of the ivory handle of the bronze mirror found with the burial revealed a decorative pattern of delicately carved rosettes. Our first public lecture about the tomb will be hosted by the ASCSA in Cotsen Auditorium on October 6.

 

Paleobotanists from the University of Thessaloniki returned to pursue their study of remains from the Palace of Nestor and the Early Helladic II settlement at Romanou under the direction of Tania Valamoti.

 

 

 

Bronze horned animal from staff or scepter, after conservation.

 

 

Mirror handle with rosettes, after conservation

 

 

Finally, the Palace of Nestor reopened on June 12. We have been pleased to support the Ministry of Culture in its efforts to improve facilities at the site since 2011.

Carol Hershenson has contributed greatly to this enterprise by supplying numerous images from the Department of Classics’s archives.

 

2016

 

Excavations at the Palace of Nestor continued for a second season under the sponsorship of the University of Cincinnati and under the aegis of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens from May 15 until June 25, co-directed by Sharon R. Stocker and Jack L. Davis, representing the University of Cincinnati. The extent of excavation was reduced in scale this year, in part owing to the need to divert resources toward the conservation of the spectacular finds from the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior, and in part because of the Greek lawyers’ strike, which made it once again impossible for us to acquire the Dimopoulos plot, adjacent to Tholos IV, in time to excavate there this summer. In respect to the latter, a positive decision to expropriate the plot for the Greek state was made by the Greek court in the autumn of 2016.

 

 

In addition to work carried out in May and June 2016, various other studies were initiated in autumn 2015 and earlier in 2016: cloth fibers have been studied by Christina Margariti, carbonized plant matter by Maria Dinou, and metals composition by Andreas Karydas and Vicky Kontarelou. Georgia Tsartsidou began to look for phytoliths in soil samples. In addition, micromorphological samples have been prepared by Takis Karkanas.

 

NEW TRENCHES

All excavation in 2016 took place in the field that lies north of the parking lot, between the Northeast Gateway of the acropolis and Tholos IV. This is the field where we found the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior in 2015.

Contact

 

Project Directors:

Sharon Stocker: sharon.stocker@uc.edu

Jack Davis: jack.davis@uc.edu

The Griffin Warrior needs your help!

Webdesign: Takin.solutions Ltd. 2016-2018 | All Rights Reserved |  Web content: University of Cincinnati Excavations at the Palace of Nestor (UCEPON)

 

 

Excavations at the Palace of Nestor continued for a second season under the sponsorship of the University of Cincinnati and under the aegis of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens from May 15 until June 25, co-directed by Sharon R. Stocker and Jack L. Davis, representing the University of Cincinnati. The extent of excavation was reduced in scale this year, in part owing to the need to divert resources toward the conservation of the spectacular finds from the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior, and in part because of the Greek lawyers’ strike, which made it once again impossible for us to acquire the Dimopoulos plot, adjacent to Tholos IV, in time to excavate there this summer. In respect to the latter, a positive decision to expropriate the plot for the Greek state was made by the Greek court in the autumn of 2016.

 

NEW TRENCHES

All excavation in 2016 took place in the field that lies north of the parking lot, between the Northeast Gateway of the acropolis and Tholos IV. This is the field where we found the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior in 2015.

 

In addition to work carried out in May and June 2016, various other studies were initiated in autumn 2015 and earlier in 2016: cloth fibers have been studied by Christina Margariti, carbonized plant matter by Maria Dinou, and metals composition by Andreas Karydas and Vicky Kontarelou. Georgia Tsartsidou began to look for phytoliths in soil samples. In addition, micromorphological samples have been prepared by Takis Karkanas.

 

 

AREA E

One important focus of our work was near the western end of the dromos of Tholos IV. In 2013 Katerina Skiada, representing the Kalamata Ephoreia, excavated in this area in conjunction with the construction of a concrete path from the parking lot to the tholos. After finding the top of a wall, she stopped digging just beneath the surface. In 2015 excavation resumed under the supervision of Evangelia Malapani, uncovering parts of three walls; excavation continued in early autumn 2015, then stopped at the bottom of these walls.

 

We were invited to continue excavation in this area, our Area E, where we opened seven trenches (E01, -02, -03, -04, -05, -06, and -07). In these, we uncovered parts of additional walls. All of the walls in this area seem to be of LH IIIA:2 early date. In all trenches, beneath the walls and extending to bedrock, was a substantial deposit of pottery and bone that sloped from north to south. The character of finds from the deposit suggest that it represents the remains of a ritual feast of LH IIIA:2 early that was used to level the ground prior to buildings subsequently being constructed here in the same period.

 

 

Complex in front of the dromos to Tholos IV. Denitsa Nenova

 

 

AREA D

In Area D we resumed excavations near the edge of the Dimopoulos plot, where several walls of the final phase of the palace were located, but no entire rooms. Several nearly complete vases were recovered, including a highly decorated rhyton.

 

 

Architecture in trench N-D04.

 

 

Mycenaean rhyton with palm and whorlshell.

 

AREA B

In 2015 in our Area B we had uncovered Early Mycenaean and Middle Helladic remains. This summer we opened two additional trenches near the Petropoulos plot where Marion Rawson had investigated Middle Helladic deposits in the 1950s, hoping to find substantial and well-preserved architectural remains. Instead we found well-preserved early Middle Helladic pottery lying near bedrock, beneath ca. 2.50 m. of re-deposited, largely sterile marl. Beneath the Middle Helladic pottery was a thin Pleistocene A-horizon, capping a B-horizon ca. 1 m. deep. In the A-horizon were two microliths, one perhaps of obsidian, the other chert.

 

Excavations in area B.

 

 

AREA C.

In trench C02 we resumed work in the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior itself, our objective this year being to examine the construction of the tomb and, we hoped, to gather additional information relevant to its chronology. With this in mind we opened three trenches adjacent to the grave, two of which were excavated down to the bottom of the exterior faces of the walls of the grave and were successful in detecting foundation trenches. Further cleaning inside the grave clarified the sequence of earth fills that had been deposited before the burial or had accumulated afterwards. Of the ca. 150 sherds of pottery from the various fills, none needs to be dated later than LH IIA. It now seems likely that the large stone in the eastern corner of the grave fell not long after the initial burial.

 

Further removal of fills along the walls of the grave inside revealed more cut, ashlar stones in their foundations; some at least appear to be reused paving slabs or drain covers, presumably scavenged from structures on the acropolis.

 

 

Exctract of 3D photogrammetry model

(Credit: Denitsa Nenova).

 

 

 

SUBSIDIARY ACTIVITIES

Other activities this summer included cleaning the storeroom in which PRAP and MARWP finds had been stored since the 1990s. The integrity of storage containers was checked and improvements made to the storeroom.This project was carried out by Efi Tsolaki in conjunction with restudy of finds from PRAP for her Ph.D. thesis.

 

Emily Egan studied fragments of painted plaster from excavations in preparation for the new roof over the Palace of Nestor. She will report on those that are of LH I-IIIA date at the conference: “(SOCIAL) PLACE AND SPACE IN EARLY MYCENAEAN GREECE,” October 5th to October 8th in Athens. Hariclia Brecoulaki also briefly studied fragments from Blegen’s excavations of Hall 64 in preparation for a monograph that she is completing.

 

 

Bronze horned animal from staff or scepter, after conservation.

 

 

 

Conservation, photography, and drawing of finds from the Tomb of the Griffin Warrior continued. We are grateful to Chronis Papanikolopoulos for photography, and to Nefeli Theocharous, Wendy Reade, and Kathy Hall for conservation.  We further thank Tom Brogan, director of the INSTAP Center in East Crete for his constant support and advice.

One bronze object that we had imagined to be a meathook (κρεάγρα) is instead an animal-headed grip for a staff or scepter. Conservation of the ivory handle of the bronze mirror found with the burial revealed a decorative pattern of delicately carved rosettes. Our first public lecture about the tomb will be hosted by the ASCSA in Cotsen Auditorium on October 6.

 

Paleobotanists from the University of Thessaloniki returned to pursue their study of remains from the Palace of Nestor and the Early Helladic II settlement at Romanou under the direction of Tania Valamoti.

 

 

 

Mirror handle with rosettes, after conservation

 

 

 

Finally, the Palace of Nestor reopened on June 12. We have been pleased to support the Ministry of Culture in its efforts to improve facilities at the site since 2011.

Carol Hershenson has contributed greatly to this enterprise by supplying numerous images from the Department of Classics’s archives.

 

2016

The Griffin Warrior needs your help!

Webdesign: Takin.solutions Ltd. 2016-2018 | All Rights Reserved |  Web content: University of Cincinnati Excavations at the Palace of Nestor (UCEPON)